Moleskine Evernote notebooks: Take a photo – it’ll last longer!

Ah. I’ve never had the opportunity to use this particular sarcastic comeback in real life, but it occurred to me this was what motivated me to trial Moleskine’s Evernote notebook: the ability to accurately record your notes from the page to the digital.

Because they’ll last longer.

Now, I’m pretty confident you don’t absolutely need to use this particular notebook to get your notes into Evernote. In fact, I know it – as I’ve frequently taken quick snaps of my inspired scribblings with my iPhone camera and added them to Evernote.

I’m not sure if I’ve fallen for Moleskine’s very slick marketing, but I think the combination of Evernote’s new 8.0 app on iOS and the quality paper and dotted lines in the Moleskine notebook make for better, more accurate and neater scans of the page.


In essence, the app recognises when you’re taking a photo of a page and attempts to line up the image – based on the fact that paper tends to have straight edges. A transparent green oblong appears on the screen in front of you as you hold your phone over the page and then Evernote turns it into a neat image within a note.

You can then add several more pages from your notebook into this particular electronic note, summarising a meeting, a workshop or just the usual mental diarrhoea you’ve decided to commit to paper.

I used the notebook for the first time yesterday and found that it did an excellent job of recording my meeting notes. The resulting images in Evernote were crisp, clear and didn’t look like a photo of a piece of paper. It was as if the handwriting were magically lifted from the page and added to the electronic note in Evernote. So, no shadows or creases, no shine from the page. Just my handwriting on the screen.


The notebooks come in a variety of sizes and formats. So if you’d rather not shell out £25 for a notebook on the off chance it’ll work for you, you might like to try one of the cheaper softcover notebooks they make.

They’re far from new and I’ve known about them for some time. It’s only now I’ve felt they would be useful for me.

This is also part of my effort to reduce the amount of ‘stuff’ I carry with me for work. After last week’s (regular) business trip to Barcelona,  returned with real back pain from my backpack. Emptying it back at home,  realised this was in no small part due to the volume of A4 paper I was carrying around.

Journal articles, hand-written notes on looseleaf A4 paper, as well as magazines and an aluminium clipboard.


So, I’ve decided to leave the A4 at home and use this compact Moleskine notebook for all work-related notes, knowing I can scan the contents into Evernote as I go along.

Yesterday, I used my super-slim Cocoon backpack and took just my iPad Pro 9.7″, my Moleskine, my Midori notebook, some assorted cables for the iPad and a couple of bananas for sustenance. And it was a revelation. Another laptop-free day, but also a productive one. And a pain-free one.

I’m far from a minimalist. But it definitely felt good to carry less stuff around with me and if notebooks like this can help, then I’m all for it.

  1. I’ve always refused to buy one of these because the high price includes three months premium membership of Evernote. That’s fine if you’re new to Evernote and get through one notebook every three months, but not if you’re already paying a separate subscription.

    I just use a standard Moleskine pocket notebook (half the price) and then use Scannable to send it to Evernote. Maybe I’ve got it wrong? Am I missing a trick?



    1. As I understand it, you now get Evernote points to ‘spend’ with them. I had enough of these points left last year to actually pay for my entire year’s subscription this year. The subsciptointhat came with this notebook was simply a code that turned into point in my account. Come September, I’ll just use them (and any others) to pay for my annual account subscription.

      That aside, I think there’s no huge difference in scanning as you describe it. For me, this is an experiment. But I know that when I ‘scan’ from my Midori notebook, it’s just not as neat or as easy. I think there’s something to the way the Moleskine pages in these Evernote books are printed.

      But it could all be in my head! 😉



  2. You left out an important advantage of the Moleskine Evernote notebooks; a paid subscription to their Pro service for three months. Even if you already have a subscription, the code in the back of the notebook will extend your renewal date by three months; not bad!

    Liked by 1 person


    1. Yes! Thank you – completely forgot.



  3. Thanks for that! Really useful info! I just assumed I would get a second Evernote subscription that I couldn’t use. I would still like to know more about how the Moleskine method compares with Scannable. Although much criticised as an app (since being acquired by Evernote) it does “latch on” to the exact size of paper, sends the document to Evernote and you can then search even handwritten pieces.
    Ok! Enough procrastinating- time for my run on Ilkley Moor!

    Liked by 1 person


    1. Enjoy your run! I squeezed in 14km this morning in a sunny but frosty London. Now undoing it all with a BBQ lunch!



  4. […] mentioned previously that I recently picked up one of Moleskine’s Evernote notebooks – long after they were […]



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