Evernote for iOS: simplified!

I’ve only spent a few minutes toying with the new version of Evernote for iOS, but I have to say I’m impressed. This newest version (Evernote 8.0) seems to be a complete rebuild of the app on iPhone and iPad and is a big step forward.

For me (and others, if you simply google it) Evernote was getting a bit slow, cumbersome and unwieldy. Alternative note-taking apps like Apple’s own Notes and Google’s Keep seemed to be snapping at its heels. Both are lightweight, fast and responsive.

But this upgrade to Evernote makes me glad I kept up my subscription. Using it on my iPhone 7 Plus is a pleasure. The interface has been pared right back to the essentials and all you get on launch is a list of your most recent apps, along with a massive ‘plus’ button at the bottom of the screen so you can start a new note.

It’s a vast improvement.

And it’s also prompted me to do some pruning and simplifying of my Evernote set-up. On reflection, I saw that I’d set up too complex a hierarchy of notebooks, themselves organised in thematic ‘stacks’. It seems after a little online research that ‘power users’ (no, I don’t like the term either) seem to make maximum use of tags and minimal use of notebooks.

It’s a bit like organising your emails into countless folders, when all you really need to do is use the search function in your email app.

So I’m re-organising things so that the only notebooks I have are those organised around:

  • My personal life
  • Job #1
  • Job #2

Everything should be able to fit into one of these and I’ll find content by using the tags I’ve been consistently applying to my notes for years. This should keep things nice and simple, especially when using the app on my phone.

Well done, Evernote. I’m looking forward to seeing how you shape up Evernote for macOS next.

  1. […] if I’ve fallen for Moleskine’s very slick marketing, but I think the combination of Evernote’s new 8.0 app on iOS and the quality paper and dotted lines in the Moleskine notebook make for better, more accurate and […]

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  2. I, too, launched it, liked the modern look and immediately deleted some things that were redundant or unnecessary. I have the basic acct, though (i *love* saying ‘pro tip’ as it’s an asshole thing to say). 🙂

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    1. I wonder what they’ll do to tidy up the macOS version… moving from iOS to Evernote on my laptop is a hell of a shock to the system, design-wise.

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      1. I haven’t signed in on desktop in a long time, since I’m on PC at work and then it’s a secure location with strict firewalls for the most idiotic stuff, like user info for software we use. Idiotic.

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        1. I think that’s a big problem with apps like Evernote – they don’t come pre-installed on computers and so it’s up to the user to find them, install them and learn how to use them.

          Many organisations environments just lock down their computers now, preventing users from adding their own software. I can see their point, but if the app comes from a recognised or pre-approved source, maybe it should be less of a problem?

          (Conscious that I don’t run IT in a large organisation!).

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          1. I think the point for me is because I’m at civil servant. And I work in a secure location.

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