One foot in front of the other

Since my knee surgery back in November, I’ve had one over-riding goal in mind: to get back running. Last week, I enjoyed two short runs out on the streets of London and finished pain-free. Slight stiffness the following day, but nothing awful.

It felt fantastic.

I’ve been slowly building up a plan to increase distance and pace every so slightly over the next few weeks. I’ve had a couple of great 5k runs along the river to begin with and did 6.2k yesterday afternoon.

My plan for completion of the Royal Parks half-marathon in October sees me increasing this over the weeks without any sudden changes. Recovery from last year’s surgery has left me wanting to avoid any more knee injuries. I don’t think I could handle the aftermath of more surgery like that.

Looks worse than it was. I think!

Looks worse than it was. I think!

Considering it was minor and the pain wasn’t too bad at all (in hindsight), it was the extended recovery that bothered me. My job made it hard to stick to the physio exercises properly and doing daft things like flying to Edinburgh and presenting at a conference just two weeks later explains some of the additional hobbling around.

Sometimes I’m my own worst enemy.

But now, I’m being really careful to avoid any more similar knee hassle – taking it slowly and enjoying each run. Races aside, I really do like running. It shouldn’t feel like “work”, but should be challenging. For me, just getting back out there and getting past my injury worries has been the challenge.

I know I can run – I know I can run fast. I now need to work on running carefully. Mindfully, if you like. So I’m in excellent shape for the Royal Parks half and enjoy it. And in terms of targets, no I’m not out to beat my BP. I’d like to finish injury-free, having enjoyed a trot around London’s beautiful parks.

  1. I know you can do it. One of those train smart, not harder things. It’s all well and good to tell teens and 20-something’s to sweat blood but by 40, they’ll feel 80. We know this! The people my age who look best are the ones who NEVER competed in school or worked heavy manual labour (which I of course did!).

    Lesson: don’t eat garbage and just walk around a lot. Too late for me but seriously, I think that’s the secret!

    Like

    Reply

    1. Agreed on all fronts. Today’s exercise was cycling, not running, which was a lot easier on the knee.

      Am also trying hard to drop a few kilos before going to Japan next month. The last few months have been both inactive and food-focused. I’m not ‘TV special obese’, but it’s a slippery slope and my job is very sedentary.

      Plus, my knees will thank me for it as I run!

      Like

      Reply

      1. Indeed! I’ve gotten a thick layer of blubber since 3 years ago being diagnosed Celiac. Thing is, a life time if eating like a TALL MAN on a shirt woman worked because my digestive tract not only didn’t absorb nutrients I needed — it didn’t process fats and all else! I enjoyed eating without getting the calories (sounds fab but it was extremely painful emitting undigested materials, ew).

        Anyway, even though I’m eating less, it’s still not where a stubby structure SHOULD. Hence I’m finally the FAT ugly ignorant American I always could have been.

        Knowing that I’m possibly headed towards having this fairly gnarly spinal reconstruction, I’m foreseeing months of true sedentary living. I do NOT want to be 200lb at 5’2″!!! If so, somebody’ll have to wheel me around in a wheelbarrow. Fuuuuuck that.

        Anyhoozles, good on yer and know you’re an inspiring hobbit!

        Like

        Reply

        1. I’ll do my best to be the most inspiring hobbit out there!

          Am having a carb-free weekend and so wishing I could chomp down on a baguette right now. It’s funny how your mind turns to what it can’t have…

          Like

          Reply

          1. Nom on some yams if allowed. VERY nutritious and will fill the void!

            Like

            Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: